How LinkedIn Execs Run Meetings


The Presentation inside:

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How LinkedIn Execs Run Meetings 9 Tips for Meetings that are Faster, More Fun, and More Focused


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Have you ever felt frustrated during a meeting? cc:  Cubmundo  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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The more senior you become, the more time you’ll spend in meetings. cc:  Thomas  Hawk  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Focused attention = manager’s most important resource Improving meetings = massive opportunity to boost productivity cc:  Chris  Smith/Out  of  Chicago  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Great meetings include: Thoughtful preparation and balanced discussion, leading to a decision and commitment to action, followed by execution thereafter. cc:  InternaKonal  Railway  Summit  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Three sections: BEFORE THE MEETING DURING THE MEETING AFTER THE MEETING cc:  hjl  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Three sections: BEFORE THE MEETING DURING THE MEETING AFTER THE MEETING cc:  hjl  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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1. Define the meeting success criteria cc:  GotCredit  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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"This meeting will be a success if..." cc:  Pim  Fijneman  (finally  back)  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Example cover slide with meeting success criteria


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Review the success criteria to start and end every meeting cc:  clagnut  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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2. Apply the RAPID framework to focus on the right people cc:  ashraful  kadir  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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The RAPID framework Recommend Provide input to a recommendation – views may or may not be reflected in final proposal Recommends a decision or action Decide Input Make the decision – Commit the organization Perform Agree Accountable for performing a decision once made Formally agrees to a decision – views must be reflected in final proposal


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At a minimum, invite the “R” (Recommender) and the “D” (Decision-maker). In most cases it makes sense to invite the “A” (Agrees with recommendation) and the “P” (Performer who executes the decision) as well. The “I” (offers Input) is generally optional.


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3. Send preread materials the day before. cc:  nashworld  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Three benefits to sending materials in advance: 1. Optimize meeting time for discussion (vs. reading) 2. Surface questions/issues before the meeting 3. Prevents all-nighters for the presenters :) cc:  kleneway1379  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Three sections: BEFORE THE MEETING DURING THE MEETING AFTER THE MEETING cc:  hjl  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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4. Begin with a silent readthrough — never present. cc:  Camera  Eye  Photography  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Most execs can read faster than you can voice over the slides Reserve first 5-10 mins. of meeting for readthrough Call out 2-3 important slides if needed cc:  mnadi  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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5. Rely on as few slides as possible, and use the whiteboard wisely. cc:  jm3  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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For a one-hour meeting: 20 slides is max (10-15 ideal) cc:  Intrepidteacher  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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The more slides you have, the lower the likelihood that any single slide is fully understood cc:  【J】  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Use the whiteboard The energy shifts from people talking at each other… To brainstorming collectively toward a common goal on the whiteboard. cc:  RobertFrancis  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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6. Poll the room using a go-around. cc:  TonZ  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Create balanced discussion cc:  diffendale  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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How the "go-around" works 1.  Facilitator asks a basic question (e.g., 0-10 scale of how people are feeling, plus/minus feedback on project) 2.  One-by-one, each person provides input 3.  Keep it focused on the go-around (no sidebar conversations) and keep discussion tight (~1-2 min. per person) 4.  Ensure everyone has a chance to participate and feels heard cc:  Leo  Reynolds  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Have fun with the question and the go-around! cc:  D7eame  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Three sections: BEFORE THE MEETING DURING THE MEETING AFTER THE MEETING cc:  hjl  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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7. Distribute action items and notes. cc:  DonkeyHotey  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Distribute action items and notes •  Notes: Keep it concise; not a play-by-play, but rather a summary of key discussion points •  Action items: Specify owner of each, and ensure deadlines to complete are clearly stated •  Ideal to send as soon as possible after meeting to avoid staleness and ensure speed of action


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8. Cascade relevant information to teams. cc:  Nanagyei  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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As a leader, you're representing your team at the meeting cc:  VinothChandar  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Give your team context on the outcome and next steps from the meeting, as soon as possible -- it will help them do their jobs better! cc:  IntelFreePress  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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9. Follow up (keep your word). cc:  iklash/  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Meetings are only as great as the commitment they create and the action they generate


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So keep your word after the meeting, and let the note-taker know you’ve completed your action items to close the feedback loop and help ensure accountability. cc:  Nanagyei  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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In summary... cc:  aresauburn™  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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Tips for Great Meetings BEFORE THE MEETING 1.  Define the meeting success criteria 2.  Apply the RAPID framework to focus on the right people 3.  Send pre-read materials the day before DURING THE MEETING AFTER 4.  Begin with a silent readthrough — never present 7.  Distribute action items and notes 5.  Rely on as few slides as possible, and use the whiteboard wisely 6.  Poll the room using a go-around THE MEETING 8.  Cascade relevant information to teams 9.  Follow up (keep your word)


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Want more? Read my LinkedIn post!


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Enjoy this presentation? Share it with your network... or better yet, during your next meeting! cc:  kylemac  -­‐  h-ps://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]  


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